Friday, October 7, 2016

Administrator named to prestigious institute mentoring African-American leaders

Cuyamaca College VP Scott Thayer
Scott W. Thayer, Cuyamaca College’s vice president of Student Services, has been named one of 15 fellows with the Thomas Lakin Institute for Mentored Leadership (Lakin Institute). The Lakin Institute is presented annually by the Presidents’ Round Table, a national association that helps prepare African-American community college leaders as chancellors, presidents, and chief executive officers.
 As Cuyamaca College’s vice president of Student Services, Thayer oversees counseling services, admissions & records, financial aid, student affairs, Extended Opportunities Program & Services (EOPS), Disabled Students Programs & Services (DSPS), and athletics. He previously held the position of assistant dean of Student Affairs at Pasadena City College near downtown Los Angeles, where he was responsible for providing comprehensive student involvement and engagement programs for 30,000 commuter students. Under his leadership, Thayer has secured over $2.6 million in additional funding in support of student success.  

 Thayer has a doctorate of education in educational leadership from the University of Southern California; a Master of Arts in counseling and guidance from Point Loma Nazarene University in San Diego; a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Rollins College in Winter Park, Fla.; and an Associate of Arts in liberal education from Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn.
“The 2016 Lakin cohort is an outstanding group of leaders who will deeply benefit from this experience,” said Kirk A Nooks, dean of the Thomas Lakin Institute for Mentored Leadership. “With the complex leadership challenges we are experiencing now, and in the future, this group will be able to demonstrate that community colleges are in good hands.”
Hosted this year in St. Paul, Minn., by the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities, the Lakin Institute seeks African-American participants whose experience and credentials indicate they are ready to attain the highest academic positions. The program is an opportunity for open dialogue with chancellors, presidents, and CEOs.  It covers all aspects of academic leadership.
 “The Thomas L. Lakin Institute experience has helped over 100 community college professionals who aspired to executive leadership to reach their goals, including serving as presidents nationwide,” said Charlene Newkirk, South Campus president of the Community College of Allegheny County, and president of the Presidents’ Round Table. “The Presidents’ Round Table is committed to growing the talent pipeline for serving our communities with capable and committed leadership.”
 More than 200 participants have attended the Lakin Institute since its inception in 1994. The Lakin Institute has the highest graduate placement rate of any leadership institute in the United States.  One of three participants become a college chancellor, president or CEO.  It is named in honor of Thomas Lakin, a former chancellor of the Ventura County Community College District.
 About the Presidents’ Round Table
The Presidents’ Round Table is a professional association of African-American CEOs and presidents of community colleges.  It has charted a course for increasing visibility in the higher education arena to support African-American leaders and students in community colleges.  Founded in 1983 to bring together African-American community college leaders for the purpose of ensuring their success as campus leaders, today the association focuses on advocacy; mentorships to ensure the African-American legacy in campus leadership positions; successful matriculations of African-American students; and employment opportunities for African-Americans in community colleges across the nation with special emphasis on grooming future presidents. Presidents’ Round Table is an affiliate organization of the National Council on Black American Affairs and the American Association of Community Colleges. For more, visithttp://theprt.pgcc.edu/.

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